NMAI_NY
freedom of expression, grantee,

The Warhol Foundation Board Lifts 8-Year Funding Ban on the Smithsonian

Foundation will award $100,000 to the National Museum for the American Indian for a major Oscar Howe retrospective

The Board of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has voted to lift its eight-year funding ban on the Smithsonian Institution. The Foundation will award $100,000 to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) for a major Oscar Howe retrospective as part of its Fall 2018 Grants, which will be announced next week. The Oscar Howe Project will include the first major retrospective, touring exhibition, and publication to feature the work of this groundbreaking and influential artist. The exhibition will include approximately 75 paintings, many of which will be on view publicly for the first time. Oscar Howe (1915-1983), a member of the Yanktonai Dakota tribe, was a pioneering student of Dorothy Dunn, an influential non-Native teacher who developed and promoted rigid aesthetic standards that came to define Native American painting in the United States in the early to mid-20th century. Howe pushed against these conventions and experimented with dynamic abstract compositions in pursuit of his own modernist style. He was openly critical of the narrow parameters imposed upon Native art and strongly defended the right of Native artists to steer their own paths. His work as both an artist and an activist is widely seen as a major influence on experimental contemporary Native art.

The funding ban on the Smithsonian was initiated in 2010 after the National Portrait Gallery, under pressure from the Catholic League and several Washington politicians, removed artist David Wojnarowicz’s video A Fire in My Belly from the Foundation-supported exhibition Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture. At the time, Foundation President Joel Wachs requested that then-Secretary Wayne Clough return the work to view noting that, “Such blatant censorship is unconscionable. It is inimical to everything the Smithsonian Institution should stand for, and everything the Andy Warhol Foundation does stand for.” When the work was not restored, the Foundation board, acting from its longstanding commitment to freedom of expression, unanimously decided to suspend funding for all Smithsonian museums.

Reflecting on the current grant, Wachs stated, “We believe that the ban has had its intended effect of promoting freedom of artistic expression at the national level. The Smithsonian has also demonstrated a strong track record of highlighting underrepresented artists over the past eight years, which aligns well with the Foundation’s core values. While Wojnarowicz and Howe were very different artists working in different circumstances, both fiercely advocated for the visibility and inclusion of marginalized perspectives in contemporary art discourse. Both were driven by a belief that communities should take control of their own narratives, particularly in the face of misguided (and malicious) attempts by others to do it for them. Howe’s work was revolutionary in its time and paved the way for Native artists to claim greater agency; his life and work are a testament to the strength of artistic commitment to shape and influence contemporary culture.”

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The Foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonné projects. To date, the Foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide.

More information about the Foundation is available at warholfoundation.org.

Header Image: The National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City. Photo by David Sundberg (2016)
WocMural2
Regional Regranting Program,

Warhol Foundation Expands Regional Regranting Program to Cleveland & Denver and Reinstates Baltimore Program

Annual program will distribute $1.4 million to organizations for approximately $840,000 in grants for under-the-radar artist-driven projects across 14 cities/states

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is expanding its Regional Regranting Program to Cleveland and Denver where it will be administered by the non-profit arts organizations SPACES and RedLine respectively. At the same time, Baltimore’s program, The Grit Fund (TGF), will come back on line after a one-year hiatus under the new administration of Baltimore Arts Realty Corp (BARCO). With the addition of these three sites to its roster of 11 others across the country, the Regional Regranting Program will be poised to distribute $1.4 million to organizations for approximately $840,000 in yearly grants for grassroots artist-driven projects across 14 cities/states.

In addition to money for grants, each regranting organization will receive significant funding for program administration and outreach. SPACES’ Satellite Fund will offer ten $6,000 project-based grants to artists in Cuyahoga County; info sessions and the application deadline will be scheduled for spring 2019. RedLine’s INSITE Fund will award 10-15 grants of up to $5,000 each to artists and arts collectives in the Denver Metro area; info sessions will begin in January for a summer 2019 application deadline. BARCO’s Grit Fund will provide 9-12 awards of up to $7,000 each for Baltimore-based projects; applications will open in February with info sessions to take place through March 2019.

Established in 2007, the Regional Regranting Program has awarded $6.4 million in grants to organizations, which has resulted in $3.6 million in direct support of 848 artist projects to date. With the expansion, regranting organizations will be located in Albuquerque, Baltimore, Chicago, Cleveland, Denver, Houston, Kansas City, Miami, Minneapolis, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Portland (OR), Portland (ME), and San Francisco. The program aims to support under-the radar projects that engage with the public. Recent examples include “Ambergris,” a multimedia installation on Portland, Maine’s Fish Exchange that explores opiate addiction in the commercial fishing industry and “Wak’ó Mujeres Phụ nữ Womxn Mural,” a collaborative mural and digital project that celebrates the daily lives of Kansan women of color.

“Informal experimental artistic practice comprises the majority of visual arts activity in this country, yet is often overlooked and lacks existing mechanisms for funding, which tend to favor high profile exhibitions at large institutions. We are confident that the expansion of the program and the reinstatement of The Grit Fund will introduce many new innovative and public-facing artist projects into the grassroots arts communities of Baltimore, Cleveland, and Denver,” said Joel Wachs, President, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

“SPACES is thrilled to work with The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts on the Satellite Fund, to support the numerous kinds of artistic practices taking place in Cuyahoga County. Aligned with our mission of supporting artists who explore and experiment, the Satellite Fund will take into consideration the plurality of expression by individual visual artists, collectives, and unincorporated artist-driven initiatives working to strengthen the culture in this region,” said Christina Vassallo, Executive Director, SPACES.

Louise Martorano, Executive Director, RedLine, spoke about the importance of the funding for the Denver arts community, “The INSITE Fund will significantly add to Denver’s creative ecosystem and infrastructure by supporting artist-driven projects that sit outside the “norm” of arts experiences and lead to expanded audiences. At RedLine, this fund supports our continuous effort to remove barriers that exist between artists and funding opportunities and thus between artists ideas and making those ideas possible.”

“We are thrilled to be able to bring the Grit Fund back to Baltimore where it has played a vital role in funding artist-led projects that have been excluded from traditional funding sources. The fund provides an important resource for artists to develop collaborative and public-facing artwork that builds on Baltimore’s national reputation as a center for transformative art that is community-based,” said Amy Bonitz, President & CEO of Baltimore Arts Realty Corporation.  

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is theadvancement of the visual arts. The Foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonné projects. To date, the Foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide.

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts: warholfoundation.org
Baltimore Arts Realty Corp (BARCO): baltimoreartsrealty.com/#grit-fund
RedLine: redlineart.org/insite-fund
SPACES: spacesgallery.org

Header Image: Wak’ó Mujeres Phụ nữ Womxn Mural, Rocket Grant 2017 Recipient, Lawrence, KS. First day of priming with community members. Photo: Leah Evans.
freedom of expression,

Warhol Foundation Condemns CAH Grant Requirement as a Flagrant Attack on Free Speech

Government agency wants to cut funding for “lewd, lascivious, vulgar, overtly political” work

New York, NY – Joel Wachs, President of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, today condemned a recent DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities (CAH) grant requirement as a flagrant attack on free speech. The proposed requirement gives CAH the right to terminate funding to grantees who produce work that is “lewd, lascivious, vulgar, overtly political, excessively violent, constitutes sexual harassment, or is, in any other way, illegal.” The requirement goes on to state that the interpretation of these terms is “at the sole discretion of CAH.” CAH emailed the requirement in a proposed amendment to grantees who had already been notified of their awards.

The Warhol Foundation has given significant grants to artist-centered organizations in the region that also receive CAH funding, including Washington Project for the Arts (WPA) and Transformer. WPA and Transformer have indicated that they will not be signing the amendment. The National Coalition Against Censorship (NCAC), a long-time grantee of the Foundation, and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of DC also intend to ask CAH to rescind the amendment.

“We fiercely condemn the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities’ recent amendment to its grantees’ contracts; we stand with NCAC, the ACLU, and the DC-area arts community in their efforts to reject funder restrictions on artistic content. The amendment is a blatant attack on free speech and a direct threat to all artists and nonprofit organizations that produce challenging work, provide diverse perspectives, and confront social and/or political issues that are of vital importance to their communities. As a government agency, CAH has a responsibility to uphold First Amendment rights; it should immediately retract the amendment, which has stifling implications for freedom of artistic expression,” said Joel Wachs, President, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

UPDATE 11/8/18, 3:50 PM: According to the Washington City Paper, Mayor Bowser is withdrawing the amendment. 

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The Foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonné projects. To date, the Foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide.

More information about the Foundation is available at warholfoundation.org.

Andy Warhol,

Foundation President Responds to Tree of Life Synagogue Shooting

“We condemn the tragic shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, the city where our founder, Andy Warhol, was born and raised. We offer our sincere condolences to the friends and families of the victims of this tragedy. This act and all hateful acts of violence seek to silence and destroy communities that have a long history of being marginalized. We are reminded of the importance of diverse perspectives and why the Foundation actively works to fight inequities in our culture. In 1980, Warhol produced a series of portraits of notable Jewish thinkers and icons, entitled “Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth Century.” We are sharing these images today to honor these leaders and to voice our support for the Jewish community at large,” Joel Wachs, President of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. October 30, 2018.

 

Warhol Foundation Board
News,

Warhol Foundation Appoints New Board Chair and Three New Board Members

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has elected a new board chair, Julián Zugazagoitia, and three new board members: Naomi Beckwith, Cary J. Davis, and Deborah Willis, Ph.D. Zugazagoitia succeeds Igor DaCosta, who recently completed his term of distinguished service. The Warhol Foundation board is a diverse group of 17 artists, curators, directors, scholars, and visual arts leaders from throughout the country.

Joel Wachs, President of the Foundation, said, “Since he joined the board seven years ago, Julián has made a significant impact and we are looking forward to his leadership as chair. At the same time, we are honored to welcome Naomi, Cary, and Deborah; their perspectives will be vital as we seek to support artist-centered institutions in the field.”

Julián Zugazagoitia has been the Director and CEO of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City since 2010. During his tenure, attendance has grown 43%. Known for his high-energy leadership and collaborative spirit, Zugazagoitia previously served as Director and CEO of El Museo del Barrio in New York, where he oversaw a $44 million renovation project. He has also held positions at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, UNESCO, and the Getty Conservation Institute, and has curated exhibitions internationally.

Naomi Beckwith is the Manilow Senior Curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (MCA), where her exhibition and book projects focus on the impact of identity and multi-disciplinary practices for shaping contemporary art. Prior to the MCA, she held positions at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia and the Studio Museum in Harlem. She served on the jury of the 56th Venice Biennale and was the 2015 recipient of the New Leadership award from ArtTable.

Cary J. Davis is a senior partner at Warburg Pincus, and is responsible for the firm’s investments in the software and financial technology sectors. In addition to serving as a director on seven corporate boards, he is Chairman-Elect of the American Academy in Rome, and has been Chairman of the Jewish Community House of Bensonhurst, Chairman of the Boys Prep charter school, an adjunct professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Business, and a member of the Contemporary Arts Council at the Museum of Modern Art.

Deborah Willis, Ph.D, is a photographer and one of the nation’s leading historians of African American photography and curator of African American culture. She is University Professor and Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University. She has received the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship and was a Richard D. Cohen Fellow in African and African American Art, Hutchins Center, Harvard University; a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow, and an Alphonse Fletcher, Jr. Fellow.

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The Foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonné projects. To date, the Foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide. More information about the Foundation is available at warholfoundation.org.

Photo: Several members of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Board. Back row (left to right): Carrie Mae Weems, Paul Ha, Adam Weinberg, Joel Wachs, Julián Zugazagoitia, Ruby Lerner, Shana Berger, Courtney Fink. Front row (left to right): Igor DaCosta, Sarah Elizabeth Lewis, Trevor Schoonmaker.

 

Warhol-Vol5-Box-EN-7560-Two-Volumes-Standing-2 (1)
Andy Warhol,

The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné: Volume 5 (1976-1978)

Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait with Skull, early 1978, acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, 16 x 13 inches, 40.6 x 33 cm. The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., Photo by Phillips/Schwab

The fifth volume of The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné has been published by Phaidon Press. Volume 5 documents Warhol’s paintings from 1976-1978 that were produced at 860 Broadway, the studio he occupied for a decade, from 1974 to 1984. This volume includes 733 paintings, featuring the Skull and Hammer and Sickle series, two of Warhol’s most powerful bodies of work. Other chapters document his commissioned portraits, a portrait series of famous athletes, the Torsos and Sex Parts paintings, and a group of self-portraits. The abstract Piss, Oxidation and Cum series, which were Warhol’s first paintings to be produced without a camera since 1962, mark a radical departure in his art.

Volume 5 is edited by Neil Printz with Sally King-Nero as Executive Editor. Printz has edited all five volumes of The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné. Started in 1993, this multi-volume scholarly project, sponsored by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, will document all of Warhol’s work in paintings, sculptures, and drawings. Single volumes are dedicated to a particular period, starting with Volume 1, which covers Warhol’s paintings and sculptures from 1961-1963. Each work is thoroughly researched; catalogue entries include detailed records of provenance, exhibitions, and relevant literature as well as supplementary illustrations and annotations recording Warhol’s visual sources and reconstructing his exhibitions. The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné presents the most exhaustive record of Warhol’s work and serves as a testament to Warhol’s enduring importance in contemporary culture.

Volume 6 is currently in preparation. Owners of works by Andy Warhol are encouraged to contact the Foundation by submitting this owner information sheet through our website.

 

 

The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné, Paintings 1976-1978 – Volume 5, Editor Neil Printz and Executive Editor Sally King Nero, Phaidon; volume 05A, open at gatefold, pages 78-79, showing 15 x 19 inch Skull Paintings, circa 1975-76. Artwork © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné, Paintings 1976-1978 – Volume 5, Editor Neil Printz and Executive Editor Sally King-Nero, Phaidon; volume 05A, open at pages 108-109, showing six-foot Hammer and Sickle Paintings, 1976. Artwork © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné, Paintings 1976-1978 – Volume 5, Editor Neil Printz and Executive Editor Sally King-Nero, Phaidon; volume 05B, open at pages 188-189, showing Oxidation: 40 x 30 inch-canvases, circa 1977-79 (left) and Oxidation: 16 x 12 inch-canvases, 1977-78 (left and right). Artwork © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Please visit Phaidon for information about ordering The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné. Save 20% + free shipping with code CHWH5.

In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The Foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and rigorous scholarly research for ongoing catalogues raisonnés projects. To date, the Foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide. Learn more at warholfoundation.org

Aerial Photo of Ucross Foundation
Grantee Spotlight,

Ucross Fellowship for Native American Visual Artists

The recently launched Ucross Fellowship for Native American Visual Artists is given to two artists annually, and provides artists with a one-month residency, a stipend, and inclusion in an exhibition in the Ucross Art Gallery. Located in northeast Wyoming in the foothills of the Bighorn Mountains, Ucross Foundation has awarded over 2,000 residencies to writers, composers, and visual artists in its 36-year-old history. This new fellowship honors Native artists in a region that holds deep cultural significance for Native American communities. Artist Sydney Jane Brooke Campbell Maybrier Pursel received the inaugural fellowship this year. Artist Brenda Mallory has been named the second recipient and will be in residence at Ucross in the fall. Both artists will be featured in an exhibition at the Museum of Art Fort Collins from January 17 – March 17, 2019 after which the exhibition will be on view at the Ucross Art Gallery from June 15 – September 14, 2019. The next fellowship application deadline is October 1st for one-month residencies taking place during March, April, or May 2019.

Photo of Sydney Pursel

Sydney Pursel specializes in socially engaged, activist, performance, video, and new media arts. As a member of the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska with strong Irish Catholic roots, she investigates personal identity and contemporary Indigenous issues through art. Some of Pursel’s projects serve to educate others about food politics, assimilation, language loss, appropriation, and history in addition to community projects that focus on language acquisition, culture, and art. At Ucross, she worked on a leather patchwork wearable and the bodysuit and stripes of a flag that will accompany a video performance.

Photo of Brenda Mallory

A member of the Cherokee Nation, Brenda Mallory produces a range of work from individual wall-hangings and sculptures to large-scale installations. She uses mixed media to create multiple forms that are joined with crude hardware or mechanical devices in ways that imply tenuous connections and aberrations. She is interested in ideas of interference and disruption of long-established systems in nature and human cultures. Mallory grew up in Oklahoma and currently lives in Portland, Oregon.

Currently on view at Ucross Art Gallery is Wildlife, Pattern and Identity: Contemporary Native American Work from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation. The exhibition features the work of ten artists, including Rick Bartow, James Lavadour, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Wendy Red Star, and Marie Watt. In honor of the Native American Fellowship, a print by Brenda Mallory (The Plural of Nexus, 2015) is also featured in the exhibition. A public reception will take place on Saturday, August 25th with a reading by Native American poet Sherwin Bitsui, who will be a writer-in-residence at Ucross. The gallery will also present the documentary Native Art Now! for the duration of the exhibition.

Photo of Ucross Foundation entrance sign

Photo Credit: Bill Megalos

The Ucross Art Gallery is located ½ mile east of the intersection of Highways 14 and 16 in Ucross, Wyoming. Gallery hours are Monday – Friday, 8:30AM – 4:00PM and on Saturdays in July and August from 10:00AM to 4:00PM.

Ucross Foundation is a Fall 2017 Grantee of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Established in 1987, the Foundation’s  mission is the advancement of the visual arts. Our innovative and flexible grants program has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad. The next application deadline is September 1, 2018. Learn more at warholfoundation.org

Header Image: Ucross Foundation, Photo credit: Bill Megalos.
Photo of Josephine Meckseper Flag
News,

Warhol Foundation Urges University of Kansas to Restore Censored Artwork

Artwork was removed under pressure from Kansas Governor and Secretary of State

In a letter sent today, Joel Wachs, President of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, strongly urged Chancellor Douglas A. Girod and Interim Provost Carl W. Lejuez at the University of Kansas to return Josephine Meckseper’s Untitled (Flag 2) to its original outdoor location on campus where it was removed after demands from Kansas Governor Jeff Colyer and Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach. Part of Creative Time’s Pledges of Allegiance series, Meckseper’s work depicts an abstracted United States in two parts on a printed graphic of the American flag. The work was originally installed on a flag pole that was erected specifically for this exhibit on July 3, 2018 and then was taken down on July 11, 2018 and moved inside the Spencer Museum of Art, the university’s art museum.

The Foundation has made substantial grants to the Spencer Museum of Art and Creative Time as well as the National Coalition Against Censorship (NCAC). The NCAC issued a joint letter with the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Kansas on July 16, 2018 that expressed similar sentiments. Full text of Wachs’ letter is below.

Dear Chancellor Girod and Interim Provost Lejuez,

As the President of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, I write you today to strongly urge you to return Josephine Meckseper’s artwork, Untitled (Flag 2) to its original site on the University of Kansas campus. We stand with the National Coalition Against Censorship, Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Kansas in our belief that it is crucial that the work be seen as the artist intended and not be censored as a result of political pressure.

The Warhol Foundation’s mission is to advance the visual arts and to support freedom of artistic expression as an essential part of an open and enlightened democracy. The Foundation pursues this goal through grants to nonprofits that value and support artists who produce challenging work – work that often sparks politically fraught conversations. In addition to its longstanding relationship with the National Coalition Against Censorship and Creative Time, which organized the Pledges of Allegiance series, the Foundation has also made substantial grants to the Spencer Museum of Art for its exhibition program and for its participation in our Regional Re-granting Initiative (along with Kansas City-based Charlotte Street Foundation). We respect the museum’s position as a prominent platform for artistic voices within a major research university, and appreciate its support of Meckseper’s work and the thoughtful and engaging discussions it has provoked. However, restoring the work to its original location is imperative and we would further suggest that it remain displayed through the fall semester so that students coming to campus can see and discuss it.

Artists play a unique role in our culture, igniting through their work difficult, but necessary, conversations that promote empathy and propel social change. These voices must not be silenced by those who find them threatening or distasteful.

Sincerely,
Joel Wachs
President
The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The Foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogues raisonnés projects. To date, the Foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide. More information about the Foundation is available at warholfoundation.org/.