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The Warhol Foundation will award $413,500 in Fall 2018 Curatorial Research Fellowships

Grants of up to $50,000 will be given in a record number for program

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts will award a total of $413,500 in Fall 2018 Curatorial Research Fellowships, the highest amount since the program began in 2008. Fellows will receive grants of up to $50,000 to support new scholarship on contemporary artistic practice, particularly that which is experimental and under-recognized. Research activities include travel, visits to relevant museums, archives and collections, convenings of colleagues and advisory groups as well as the development of related publications. Recipients were selected through the foundation’s biannual open submission process. Curatorial Research Fellowships account for $708,500 of the foundation’s current fiscal year grants budget which totals $13.9 million.

The Fall 2018 Curatorial Research Fellows and supporting institutions are as follows: Kyung An, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Janet Dees, Block Museum of Art; Naima Keith and Diana Nawi, Prospect.5; Daniela Lieja Quintanar, LACE; Meg Onli, Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; Philippe Pirotte, UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive; Lydia Platón Lázaro, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Puerto Rico; Hallie Ringle, The Studio Museum in Harlem; Manuela Well-Off-Man, Museum of Contemporary Native Arts; and Christian Xatrec and Alice Centamore, Emily Harvey Foundation.

“The curators in this group will conduct research on artists and movements that have been overlooked or ignored while engaging with, in many cases, difficult subject matter that is timely and culturally relevant. Their projects will bring new perspectives and methodologies to bear on the study of exhibition-making and currents in contemporary art,” said Joel Wachs, the foundation’s President.

Commenting on the role the fellowship will play in the development of the exhibition Exposure: Native Art and Political Ecology, Manuela Well-Off-Man noted that through interviews with Native populations living on former military test-sites, the fellowship will allow “us to give Indigenous artists a voice to address the long-term effects of man-made, hazardous disasters on Indigenous communities, and consult with experts in the field, including scientists and environmentalists, who can help shape the project.”

In a joint statement, Naima Keith and Diana Nawi reflected on the award’s significance in the early stages of planning for Prospect.5, “We are thrilled to receive the fellowship to support our research at this stage. So much of our methodology is dependent on deep dialogue, and this award enables us to be on the ground and in conversation with different communities and cultural producers in New Orleans, the broader region, and beyond.”

The Curatorial Research Fellowship program is in its 11th year; it has awarded $4.2 million to 125 curators to date. Curators at any career stage are encouraged to apply; applicants must have the formal support of an institution. The next deadline is March 1, 2019.

Fall 2018 Curatorial Research Fellowships | Project Descriptions

Kyung An | Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY
Kyung An, with co-curators, Soojung Kang (Senior Curator, National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul), and Joan Kee (Associate Professor of History of Art, University of Michigan), will explore the dynamic experimental artistic practices that emerged in South Korea in the late 1960s and early 1970s as well as the core groups of artists who spearheaded them in preparation for an exhibition in 2021/22.

Janet Dees | Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
In preparation for the exhibition A Site of Struggle: Making Meaning of Anti-Black Violence in American Art and Visual Culture (working title), Dees will travel to conduct research in archives and collections around the country. She will also bring together scholars, artists, community members, and others for in-depth discussions of the manner in which anti-black violence has been depicted in art over the 19th and 20th centuries and in our day.

Naima Keith and Diana Nawi | Prospect.5, New Orleans, LA
To prepare for the fifth iteration of Prospect New Orleans, artistic directors Naima Keith and Diana Nawi will research, travel, and undertake coalition-building to develop and clarify a set of framing concepts and overall themes for the triennial. Prospect.5 will open in October of 2020.

Daniela Lieja Quintanar | LACE, Los Angeles, CA
Lieja Quintanar is undertaking a project that traces a genealogy of collective artistic practices responding to border violence in Mexico and Central America, and that also examines the ramifications of such violence in US immigrant destination cities like San Diego, El Paso, and Los Angeles. Lieja Quintanar will travel to specific border cities where she will meet with and interview emerging and mid-career artists as well as collectives, curators, academics, activists and journalists, culminating in a bilingual publication, public programs, and an exhibition.

Meg Onli | Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
In preparation for the first career survey of the work of Ulysses Jenkins, the pioneering black performance and video artist who was a central figure in the Studio Z artist group, Meg Onli will undertake several research trips in California and New York, conduct interviews, and explore Jenkin’s archives. The curators will produce an accompanying publication and timeline that will chronicle Jenkins’ career trajectory.

Philippe Pirotte | UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley, CA
The Color Curtain and the Promise of Bandung will bring together historical and contemporary artwork that engages with the Non-Aligned Movement, a group of states not formally aligned with any major power bloc that grew out of a historic 1955 conference in Bandung, Indonesia. Working with an international curatorial team, Pirotte will visit Singapore, Bangladesh, Beirut, Ghana, New York, and Paris among other locations as part of his research.

Lydia Platón Lázaro | Museo de Arte Contemporáneo, San Juan, Puerto Rico
To produce Mourning the Dead: Artists response in the aftermath of Hurricanes Irma and Maria, planned for early 2021,  Platón-Lázaro will research and document creative projects that engage with the losses and grief that pervaded Puerto Rico following the two named devastating storms that took place amid a crippling economic crisis. In addition to the exhibition, Platón-Lázaro will organize a scholarly conference on the intersection of art history, death, mourning, and resilience from a variety of viewpoints.

Hallie Ringle | The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY
Leading a collaboration between The Studio Museum in Harlem and the Birmingham Museum of Art, Ringle (Hugh Kaul Curator of Contemporary Art at the Birmingham Museum of Art and former Assistant Curator at The Studio Museum in Harlem) will produce a traveling exhibition and accompanying monograph—the first ever—on the life and work of artist Mavis Pusey. As a part of her research, she will travel to New York, London, Philadelphia and elsewhere where Pusey studied and worked, making abstract paintings and prints in the mid to late 20th century. Additionally, Ringle will develop an archive of Pusey’s work, which will be vital in documenting this important, yet under-examined and underrepresented artist.

Manuela Well-Off-Man | Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, Santa Fe, NM
To support the forthcoming exhibition Exposure: Native Art and Political Ecology, planned for 2021, Well-Off-Man will visit Indigenous communities in Australia, Canada, Greenland, and the United States, and investigate how their artists have responded to damage caused by nuclear and uranium poisoning on and around their land. An exhibition catalogue will also be produced exploring the deleterious effects nuclear testing has had on native communities around the world.

Christian Xatrec and Alice Centamore | Emily Harvey Foundation, New York, NY
Something Else will celebrate and explore the groundbreaking publishing project Something Else Press (SEP) founded by Dick Higgins in 1963 and active until 1974. Xatrec and Centamore will travel to related archives in the United States and Europe where they will unearth previously unexplored materials which will illuminate the rhizomatic network of the SEP artists and projects. The presentation, sharing, and discussion of their research will first be manifested and put to use over the course of a four-day gathering of scholars, curators, artists, and publishers, to take place at The Emily Harvey Foundation in September 2019.

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The foundation runs an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonné projects. To date, the foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide.

More information about the foundation is available at warholfoundation.org.

Header Image: Mavis Pusey, Puriv, c. 1968, Oil on canvas, 40 × 56 1/2 in. The Studio Museum in Harlem; Museum purchase with funds provided by the Acquisition Committee  2018.4.1 . Photo: Brock & Co, Concord, Massachusetts
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The Warhol Foundation Announces Fall 2018 Grants

$3.65 million will be awarded to 42 arts organizations for scholarly exhibitions, publications, and visual arts programming

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has announced the recipients of its Fall 2018 grant round. $3.65 million will be awarded to 42 arts organizations for exhibitions, publications, and visual arts programming, including film screenings, artist residencies, and new commissions. The foundation has an open submission process with application deadlines in the spring and fall. This biannual program represents $7.2 million of the foundation’s fiscal year grants budget which totals $13.9 million. This round of recipients was selected from an applicant pool of 273 nonprofit organizations. Individual grants range from $44,000-$120,000. A complete list of recipients follows.

The foundation supports artist-centered organizations with a focus on practices that are experimental, under-recognized, and/or challenging in nature. Current grants will fund projects in 16 US states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico with one international recipient, Ashkal Alwan, whose Home Works Forum gathers artists, curators, and scholars from around the world at its home base in Beirut. The foundation’s commitment to highlighting the work of innovative yet often marginalized practitioners is evident in grantee projects, which include a significant exhibition of Arab American artists produced by the St. Paul, MN-based organization Mizna, a series of books published by Visual AIDS that champion the activist practices of artists affected by the disease, and IndieCollect’s restoration and touring retrospective of important films by queer filmmakers. Half of the monographic exhibitions supported in this grant round feature female artists; eight of the ten are dedicated to artists of color. In alignment with the foundation’s commitment to freedom of artistic expression, a grant to the Media Democracy Fund will continue to aid its efforts to insure an open, accessible, and secure internet.

“We strive to support institutions that share our artist-centered values. The small grassroots arts organizations as well as the museums represented here provide invaluable opportunities for artists to express their unique perspectives on the pressing urgencies of the day. We hope that our grants help to amplify artists’ voices within their communities, in national discussions and debates, and across platforms in the international contemporary art world,” said Joel Wachs, the foundation’s President.

Reinforcing the value of the grant to working artists, Bradford Nordeen, Creative Director and Founder of Los Angeles-based Dirty Looks, explained that the award “embolden[s] our support for and compensation of the 75+ arts workers who make the project a reality, ensuring that our artist fees contribute toward a sustainable artistic practice, across our varied collaborations.”

Fall 2018 Grant Recipients | Support for Single Exhibitions

  • Ars Nova Workshop, Philadelphia, PA, Milford Graves exhibition, $44,000
  • UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley, CA, “Ron Nagle: Handsome Drifter,” $75,000
  • Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati, OH, “Art and Race Matters: The Career of Robert Colescott,” $100,000
  • Davis Museum at Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA, “Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons,” $75,000
  • The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, “From the Uncanny Valley to the Crypto Sublime,” $100,000
  • Institute of Contemporary Art / University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, Karyn Olivier exhibition, $50,000
  • John Michael Kohler Arts Center, Sheboygan, WI, “Lenore Tawney: Mirror of the Universe,” $75,000
  • Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, New York, NY, “ON OUR BACKS: The Revolutionary Art of Queer Sex Work,” $50,000
  • Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY, Mrinalini Mukherjee exhibition, $100,000
  • Mizna, St. Paul, MN, “History Is Not Here: Art and the Arab Imaginary,” $50,000
  • MoMA PS1, Long Island City, NY, Group exhibition that grapples with the legacies of the Gulf War in 1991 and the invasion of Iraq in 2003, $100,000
  • Museum of Chinese in America, New York, NY, “Godzilla vs. the Art World: Asian American Collectives,” $50,000
  • Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, TX, “No Man’s Land: Women of Land Art,” $100,000
  • National Museum of the American Indian, New York, NY, “The Oscar Howe Project,” $100,000
  • Pérez Art Museum Miami, Miami, FL, “Teresita Fernández: Elemental,” $100,000
  • Pomona College Museum of Art / Montgomery Art Center, Claremont, CA, Todd Gray exhibition, $50,000
  • Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, WA, “The Allure of Matter: Contemporary Art from China,” $100,000
  • Tufts University Art Galleries, Medford, MA, “Art for the Future: Artists Call and Transnational Solidarity in the 1980s,” $75,000
  • Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN, “Still (A)live,” $100,000

Fall 2018 Grant Recipients | Program Support

  • African Film Festival, New York, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Art Papers, Atlanta, GA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Ashkal Alwan, Beirut, Lebanon, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Beta-Local, San Juan, Puerto Rico, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Burlington City Arts Foundation, Burlington, VT, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Center for Women and Their Work, Austin, TX, $90,000 (over 2 years)
  • Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, IA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Dirty Looks, Los Angeles, CA, $50,000
  • DiverseWorks, Houston, TX, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • IndieCollect, New York, NY, $60,000
  • Light Industry, Brooklyn, NY $60,000 (over 2 years)
  • Midway Contemporary Art, Minneapolis, MN, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • The Mistake Room, Los Angeles, CA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • New Venture Fund, Media Democracy Fund, Washington, DC, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, Philadelphia, PA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, Portland, OR, $120,000 (over 2 years)
  • Root Division, San Francisco, CA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Santa Fe Art Institute, Santa Fe, NM, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Socrates Sculpture Park, Long Island City, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Times Square Alliance, New York, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • The Underground Museum, Los Angeles, CA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, Salt Lake City, UT, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Visual AIDS, New York, NY, $80,000 (over 2 years)

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonné projects. To date, the foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide.

More information about the foundation is available at warholfoundation.org.

Header Image: Future Ladies of Wrestling at Moonlight Rollerway (5110 San Fernando Rd, Glendale, CA) on July 04, 2018. Photograph by Paolo Singer, event organized by Women’s Center for Creative Work. Courtesy of Dirty Looks.
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Warhol Foundation Appoints New Board Chair and Three New Board Members

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has elected a new board chair, Julián Zugazagoitia, and three new board members: Naomi Beckwith, Cary J. Davis, and Deborah Willis, Ph.D. Zugazagoitia succeeds Igor DaCosta, who recently completed his term of distinguished service. The Warhol Foundation board is a diverse group of 17 artists, curators, directors, scholars, and visual arts leaders from throughout the country.

Joel Wachs, President of the Foundation, said, “Since he joined the board seven years ago, Julián has made a significant impact and we are looking forward to his leadership as chair. At the same time, we are honored to welcome Naomi, Cary, and Deborah; their perspectives will be vital as we seek to support artist-centered institutions in the field.”

Julián Zugazagoitia has been the Director and CEO of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City since 2010. During his tenure, attendance has grown 43%. Known for his high-energy leadership and collaborative spirit, Zugazagoitia previously served as Director and CEO of El Museo del Barrio in New York, where he oversaw a $44 million renovation project. He has also held positions at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, UNESCO, and the Getty Conservation Institute, and has curated exhibitions internationally.

Naomi Beckwith is the Manilow Senior Curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (MCA), where her exhibition and book projects focus on the impact of identity and multi-disciplinary practices for shaping contemporary art. Prior to the MCA, she held positions at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia and the Studio Museum in Harlem. She served on the jury of the 56th Venice Biennale and was the 2015 recipient of the New Leadership award from ArtTable.

Cary J. Davis is a senior partner at Warburg Pincus, and is responsible for the firm’s investments in the software and financial technology sectors. In addition to serving as a director on seven corporate boards, he is Chairman-Elect of the American Academy in Rome, and has been Chairman of the Jewish Community House of Bensonhurst, Chairman of the Boys Prep charter school, an adjunct professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Business, and a member of the Contemporary Arts Council at the Museum of Modern Art.

Deborah Willis, Ph.D, is a photographer and one of the nation’s leading historians of African American photography and curator of African American culture. She is University Professor and Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University. She has received the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship and was a Richard D. Cohen Fellow in African and African American Art, Hutchins Center, Harvard University; a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow, and an Alphonse Fletcher, Jr. Fellow.

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The Foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonné projects. To date, the Foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide. More information about the Foundation is available at warholfoundation.org.

Photo: Several members of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Board. Back row (left to right): Carrie Mae Weems, Paul Ha, Adam Weinberg, Joel Wachs, Julián Zugazagoitia, Ruby Lerner, Shana Berger, Courtney Fink. Front row (left to right): Igor DaCosta, Sarah Elizabeth Lewis, Trevor Schoonmaker.

 

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Warhol Foundation Urges University of Kansas to Restore Censored Artwork

Artwork was removed under pressure from Kansas Governor and Secretary of State

In a letter sent today, Joel Wachs, President of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, strongly urged Chancellor Douglas A. Girod and Interim Provost Carl W. Lejuez at the University of Kansas to return Josephine Meckseper’s Untitled (Flag 2) to its original outdoor location on campus where it was removed after demands from Kansas Governor Jeff Colyer and Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach. Part of Creative Time’s Pledges of Allegiance series, Meckseper’s work depicts an abstracted United States in two parts on a printed graphic of the American flag. The work was originally installed on a flag pole that was erected specifically for this exhibit on July 3, 2018 and then was taken down on July 11, 2018 and moved inside the Spencer Museum of Art, the university’s art museum.

The Foundation has made substantial grants to the Spencer Museum of Art and Creative Time as well as the National Coalition Against Censorship (NCAC). The NCAC issued a joint letter with the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Kansas on July 16, 2018 that expressed similar sentiments. Full text of Wachs’ letter is below.

Dear Chancellor Girod and Interim Provost Lejuez,

As the President of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, I write you today to strongly urge you to return Josephine Meckseper’s artwork, Untitled (Flag 2) to its original site on the University of Kansas campus. We stand with the National Coalition Against Censorship, Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Kansas in our belief that it is crucial that the work be seen as the artist intended and not be censored as a result of political pressure.

The Warhol Foundation’s mission is to advance the visual arts and to support freedom of artistic expression as an essential part of an open and enlightened democracy. The Foundation pursues this goal through grants to nonprofits that value and support artists who produce challenging work – work that often sparks politically fraught conversations. In addition to its longstanding relationship with the National Coalition Against Censorship and Creative Time, which organized the Pledges of Allegiance series, the Foundation has also made substantial grants to the Spencer Museum of Art for its exhibition program and for its participation in our Regional Re-granting Initiative (along with Kansas City-based Charlotte Street Foundation). We respect the museum’s position as a prominent platform for artistic voices within a major research university, and appreciate its support of Meckseper’s work and the thoughtful and engaging discussions it has provoked. However, restoring the work to its original location is imperative and we would further suggest that it remain displayed through the fall semester so that students coming to campus can see and discuss it.

Artists play a unique role in our culture, igniting through their work difficult, but necessary, conversations that promote empathy and propel social change. These voices must not be silenced by those who find them threatening or distasteful.

Sincerely,
Joel Wachs
President
The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The Foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogues raisonnés projects. To date, the Foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide. More information about the Foundation is available at warholfoundation.org/.

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Warhol Foundation Will Award Six Spring 2018 Curatorial Research Fellowships

Grants Up To $50,000 Will Support New Contemporary Art Scholarship

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts will award six Spring 2018 Curatorial Research Fellowships to encourage new scholarship in the field of contemporary art. Recipients will receive grants up to $50,000 each for a total of $295,000 to support travel, archival research, convenings, interviews, and other related activities. Applications are reviewed through the Foundation’s open biannual submission process. Curators at any stage in their careers are eligible to apply with the formal support of an institution. The number of awarded fellowships varies with each round based on  the strength of applications. The next application deadline is September 1, 2018. The Foundation’s current annual grants budget is $13.9 million.

The Spring 2018 Curatorial Research Fellows are Emma Chubb with Smith College Museum of Art; Eric Crosby with The Carnegie Museum of Art; Perrin Lathrop with Fisk University Galleries; Kate MacKay with Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA); Pavel Pyś with The Walker Art Center; and Haema Sivanesan with Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. In alignment with the Foundation’s values, the proposed projects explore new approaches to contemporary art scholarship, research challenging practices, and highlight under-recognized artists and movements.

Joel Wachs, President of the Foundation, said, “These six curators are engaging with urgent cultural issues including income inequality, how we represent resistance, and how dominant narratives are shaped, and most importantly, by whom. We’re confident this research will lead to significant contemporary art scholarship.”

Haema Sivanesan spoke about the fellowship’s impact, “The Fellowship will allow me to pursue a research project centered on artistic process and methodology in the context of avant garde and engaged art practice.” She continued, “This Fellowship assists in advancing the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria’s goal to further advocate for the civic relevance of the contemporary visual arts.”

Eric Crosby also reflected on the award, “The fellowship is nothing less than a transformative boost in the early stages of my exhibition research at Carnegie Museum of Art.” “It will also provide the necessary resources to engage a new network of artists, curators, writers, and thinkers from around the country right here in Pittsburgh,” he added.

2018 Curatorial Research Fellowships | Project Descriptions:

Emma Chubb | Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, MA
Chubb is preparing for a mid-career retrospective for Younès Rahmoun, his first solo show in North America, which will include a residency on the Smith College campus. She will organize a two-day international conference with scholars, curators and artists and make several trips to Morocco to research the cultural context in which the artist works. The exhibition will deal with issues of migration, climate change, decolonization, and spirituality.

Eric Crosby | Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA
Planned for 2020, Working Thought will be a multigenerational group exhibition of 30 artists conceived of and curated by Crosby that will take on issues of economic inequality in America. Crosby will undertake extensive exploratory travel around the United States, mindful that economic conditions that impact the thinking and output of artists vary regionally.

Perrin Lathrop | Fisk University Galleries, Nashville, TN
In Fall 2020, Fisk University Galleries in Nashville, Tennessee will open Art from Africa of Our Time: African Modernism in America, 1947-1967, the first major exhibition to examine the New York-based Harmon Foundation’s promotion of modern African art during the age of decolonization, the Civil Rights Movement and the Cold War

Kate MacKay | Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA),  Berkeley, CA
MacKay will engage in broad ranging research into the international evolution of resistance filmmaking. She will forge significant connections with colleagues at archives in Tokyo, Paris, Berlin, Moscow, and Havana, which will be invaluable to both the research and development of the resulting film series and future exhibitions at BAMPFA.

Pavel Pyś | Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN
Challenging the dominant narrative of post-war abstraction as an inherently Western phenomenon, Pyś is planning a 2020 exhibition that will examine how the ideological poles that shaped and informed abstraction from 1945 through the 1970s manifested in Lahore, Baghdad, Sao Paulo, Tokyo, and other centers not traditionally considered in canonical art history.

Haema Sivanesan | Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, Victoria, Canada
Sivanesan will explore the Engaged Buddhism movement in North America from the 1950s to the present to examine the relationships between art and practices of self-awareness, and how those relationships inform processes of social change. She will bring together artists, scholars, Engaged Buddhist practitioners, and others for a three-day retreat and conference culminating in an exhibition slated for 2021, In the Present Moment: Buddhism, Contemporary Art and Social Practice.

The Curatorial Research Fellowship Program is in its 10th year and has awarded 105 curators with $3.5 million to date. Many supported projects have led to significant exhibitions, many of which received additional Foundation support, such as Six Lines of Flight: Shifting Geographies in Contemporary Art at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art curated by Apsara DiQuinzio; Temporal Turn: Art and Speculation in Contemporary Asia at the Spencer Museum curated by Kris Imants Ercums; and Un|Fixed Homeland at the Aljira Contemporary Art Center curated by Grace Aneiza Ali.

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The Foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogues raisonnés projects. To date, the Foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide. More information about the Foundation is available at warholfoundation.org.

Header Image: Diller Scofidio + Renfro, UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, 2016. View from Oxford and Addison Streets with outdoor screen. Photo by Iwan Baan. Courtesy of Diller Scofidio + Renfro; EHDD; and UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA).
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Warhol Foundation Announces Spring 2018 Grants

$3.6 Million To Be Awarded to 42 Arts Organizations Nationwide

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has announced the recipients of its Spring 2018 grant round. In total 42 organizations will receive $3.6 million for scholarly exhibitions, publications, and visual arts programming, including artist residencies and new commissions. The Foundation has an open submission process with biannual application deadlines. The program is highly competitive; this round of recipients was selected from an applicant pool of 224 nonprofit arts organizations. Individual grants range from $35,000-$120,000. A complete list of recipients follows.

The Foundation supports contemporary art, particularly work that is experimental, under-recognized, and challenging in nature. A focus on artistic engagement with social and political urgencies is a common thread among many recipients including Gallery 400 in Chicago, Project Row Houses in Houston, Slought in Philadelphia, and first-time grantee, Los Angeles Poverty Department on LA’s Skid Row. The Foundation is committed to supporting women, artists of color, and under-represented practitioners; its grants to the Chinese Culture Foundation of San Francisco, the Heard Museum in Phoenix, the Women’s Center for Creative Work in Los Angeles, and the Alliance for Artist Communities in Providence for its equity, diversity, and inclusion initiatives reinforce this commitment. Seven out of the eight grants for retrospectives will feature female artists including Harriet Bart at the Weisman Art Museum, Suzanne Lacy at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and Zilia Sánchez at the Phillips Collection. Defending freedom of artistic expression is central to the Foundation’s core values and in this round, it will award a grant to PEN America for its programs for visual artists at risk.

Joel Wachs, President of the Foundation, stated, “Many of these organizations are small with budgets well under $1 million, yet they are providing vital professional support to a diverse set of artists while remaining socially engaged in their communities. This work is inspiring at a time when many groups in this country feel threatened – women, people of color, the LGBTQ community, to name a few. At the same time, we are honored to support museum exhibitions that will bring the work of important artists, many of whom have not received the national recognition they deserve, to the public.”

“Artists are at the frontlines of social change and dissent, and need to know that when they take risks, the creative community has their back,” said Suzanne Nossel, Chief Executive Officer, PEN America. “We are extremely grateful to the Warhol Foundation for supporting this work and helping to draw attention to artists who pay a high personal and professional price for daring to express themselves,” she added.

Conrad Meyers, Director, Aggregate Space Gallery, explained the impact of the funding for artists in the Bay Area, “it gives us the opportunity to pay critical artists stipends, supporting the creation of new work, allowing artists to take risks and use their talents to push the audience’s perceptions of what can be accomplished.” He continued, “This funding helps us on our journey of growth from an artist-run space to a reliable long-term resource for emerging artists.”

Spring 2018 Grant Recipients | Program Support

  • Aggregate Space Gallery, Oakland, CA, $90,000 (over 2 years)
  • Alliance of Artists Communities, Providence, RI, $120,000 (over 2 years)
  • Art in General, Brooklyn, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Artpace, San Antonio, TX, $100,0000 (over 2 years)
  • Artists in Residence in Everglades, Miami Beach, FL, $80,000 (over 2 years)
  • Artists Space, New York, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Borscht Corp. Miami, FL, $50,000
  • BURNAWAY, Atlanta, GA, $35,000 (over 2 years)
  • Chinese Culture Foundation of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Gallery 400 at The University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center, Buffalo, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • International Studio & Curatorial Program, Brooklyn, NY, $80,000 (over 2 years)
  • KMAC Museum, Louisville, KY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • List Visual Arts Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, Los Angeles, CA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Los Angeles Poverty Department, Los Angeles, CA, $80,000 (over 2 years)
  • Maysles Documentary Center, New York, NY, $50,000 (over 2 years)
  • PEN America, New York, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Project Row Houses, Houston, TX, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • RAIR, Philadelphia, PA, $85,000 (over 2 years)
  • Recess, Brooklyn, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Slought Foundation, Philadelphia, PA, $80,000 (over 2 years)
  • SPACE Gallery, Portland, ME, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Washington Project for the Arts, Washington, DC, $80,000 (over 2 years)
  • Women’s Center for Creative Work, Los Angeles, CA, $60,000 (over 2 years)
  • Women’s Studio Workshop, Rosendale, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)

Spring 2018 Grant Recipients | Exhibition Support

  • The Contemporary Austin, Austin, TX, “The Sorcerer’s Burden” exhibition, $100,000
  • deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln, MA, “Visionary New England” exhibition, $80,000
  • The Heard Museum, Phoenix, AZ, “RE:DEFINE” exhibition, $100,000
  • The Institute of the Arts and Sciences of the UC Santa Cruz Arts Division, for “Newton and Helen Mayer Harrison’s A Future Garden for the Central Coast of California”, at the UCSC Arboretum and Botanic Garden, Santa Cruz, CA, $57,000
  • The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, MA, “Huma Bhabha” exhibition, $100,000
  • Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, Nayland Blake exhibition, $100,000
  • Museum of the African Diaspora, San Francisco, CA, “Coffee, Rhum, Sugar & Gold: A Postcolonial Paradox” exhibition, $50,000
  • Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, “Pattern and Decoration” exhibition, $100,000
  • Newark Museum, Newark, NJ, “Wendy Red Star: Annúkaxua / A Scratch on the Earth” exhibition, $70,000
  • New Museum, New York, NY, Sarah Lucas exhibition, $100,000
  • The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, “Zilia Sánchez: Soy Isla” exhibition, $100,000
  • Providence College Galleries, Providence, RI, “Beyond Bauhaus” exhibition series, $65,000
  • San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA, “Suzanne Lacy: We Are Here” exhibition, $100,000
  • The Miriam & Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery, Columbia University, New York, NY, “Waiting for Omar Gatlato: A Survey of Algerian Contemporary Art” exhibition, $60,000
  • Weisman Art Museum, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, “Harriet Bart: Abracadabra and Other Forms of Protection” exhibition, $75,000
  • Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY, Rachel Harrison exhibition, $100,000

For more details about the organizations and their funded projects, see below.