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Photo of Installation at Alabama Contemporary
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The Warhol Foundation Announces Spring 2019 Grants

$3.81 million will be awarded to 41 arts organizations for scholarly exhibitions, publications, and visual arts programming

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has announced the recipients of its Spring 2019 grant round. $3.81 million will be awarded to 41 arts organizations for scholarly exhibitions, publications, and visual arts programming, including film screenings, artist residencies, and new commissions. The foundation has an open submission process with application deadlines in the spring and fall. This biannual program accounts for $8 million of the foundation’s current fiscal year grants budget which totals $14.3 million. The program is highly competitive; this round of recipients was selected from an applicant pool of 249 nonprofit arts organizations. Individual grants range from $60,000-$120,000. A complete list of recipients follows.

The foundation supports artist-centered organizations with a focus on practices that are experimental, under-recognized, and/or challenging in nature. Current grants will fund projects in 12 US states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The foundation strives to highlight innovative yet often marginalized practitioners working at organizations around the country, including those that operate outside of urban arts centers, such as the Coleman Center for the Arts in York, Alabama and M12 in Broomfield, Colorado. Five out of the six monographic exhibitions supported in this grant round feature female artists. In alignment with the foundation’s commitment to freedom of artistic expression, a grant to Columbia University’s Committee on Global Thought will support significant research into the impact of the polarized political environment on cultural production.

“The grantees in this round range from small arts organizations with one staff member to major museums, yet they all provide essential resources for artists as well as innovative platforms for critical cultural dialogue. Creative risk-taking is at the heart of this country’s most meaningful social, political, and cultural developments, therefore we are proud to stand behind artist-centered organizations that support experimental practice,” said Joel Wachs, the foundation’s President.

Elizabet Elliott, Director of Exhibitions and Programs at Alabama Contemporary Art Center, explained that the foundation’s support will help, “emerging artists find a venue for politically engaged, experimental, and socially conscious work that has no natural home in the commercial art market. The Warhol Foundation is helping us to make a difference in our community by helping artists make a difference in the world.”

Reinforcing the value of the grant for artists and audiences alike, David Oresick, Executive Director of Pittsburgh-based Silver Eye Center for Photography, said, “because of the Warhol Foundation our artists will realize new works and take creative risks, and our audience will be able to engage deeply and meaningfully with new ideas in photography.”

Spring 2019 Grant Recipients | Support for Single Exhibitions

  • Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL, “Barbara Kruger: Rethink. Remake. Replay,” $100,000
  • Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY, “Lorraine O’Grady, Both/And,” $100,000
  • Diaspora Vibe Cultural Arts Incubator, Miami, FL, “”Inter | Sectionality: Diaspora Art in the Creole City,” $80,000
  • New Museum, New York, NY, “”Grief and Grievance: Art and Mourning in America,” $100,000
  • The Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, NY, “Telling Stories” and “Platform: Tomashi Jackson,” $100,000
  • The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, “”Moira Dryer: Back in Business,” $75,000
  • The Power Plant, Toronto, Canada, “Arctic/Amazon,” $100,000
  • The Queens Museum, Queens, NY, “Property and Life,” $75,000
  • San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA, “Dawoud Bey: An American Project,” $100,000
  • Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY, Julie Mehretu exhibition, $100,000

Spring 2019 Grant Recipients | Program Support

  • Alabama Contemporary Art Center, Mobile, AL, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Arizona State University Art Museum, Tempe, AZ, $90,000 (over 2 years)
  • Artists’ Television Access, San Francisco, CA, $60,000 (over 2 years)
  • Art21, New York, NY, $100,000
  • Beall Center for Art and Technology / University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Bidoun Projects, Brooklyn, NY, $75,000 (over 2 years)
  • Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts / Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Center for Independent Documentary, Boston, MA, Shirley Clarke documentary, $100,000
  • The Center for Land Use Interpretation, Culver City, CA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Charlotte Street Foundation, Kansas City, MO, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Clockshop, Los Angeles, CA, $60,000 (over 2 years)
  • Coleman Center for the Arts, York, AL, $80,000 (over 2 years)
  • Committee on Global Thought, Columbia University, New York, NY $95,000
  • Denniston Hill, Glen Wild, NY, $80,000 (over 2 years)
  • The Drawing Center, New York, $120,000 (over 2 years)
  • Human Resources, Los Angeles, CA, $60,000 (over 2 years)
  • The Lab, San Francisco, CA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Light Work, Syracuse, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, New York, NY $120,000 (over 2 years)
  • M12, Broomfield, CO, $60,000 (over 2 years)
  • Museum of Contemporary Art, Tucson, AZ, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • New Orleans Film Society, New Orleans, LA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition, Oklahoma City, OK, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Participant Inc., New York, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Performa, New York, NY, $100,000
  • Printed Matter, New York, NY $120,000 (over 2 years)
  • Silver Eye Center for Photography, Pittsburgh, PA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Southern Exposure, San Francisco, CA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • University Galleries, Illinois State University, Normal, IL, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • The USF Contemporary Art Museum (CAM), Tampa, FL, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • The Velaslavasay Panorama, Los Angeles, CA, $60,000 (over 2 years)

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonné projects. To date, the foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide.

More information about the foundation is available at warholfoundation.org.

Header Image: Gallery view of Urban Wild: Folk and Street Art in the South on view at Alabama Contemporary until October 26, 2019. Exhibition features the work of 38 artists, 6 site-specific installations and 3 satellite murals. Image features work by Michi Meko, Poppy Garcia, and Chad Burton Johnson. Courtesy Alabama Contemporary.
Work by Mavis Pusey
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The Warhol Foundation will award $413,500 in Fall 2018 Curatorial Research Fellowships

Grants of up to $50,000 will be given in a record number for program

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts will award a total of $413,500 in Fall 2018 Curatorial Research Fellowships, the highest amount since the program began in 2008. Fellows will receive grants of up to $50,000 to support new scholarship on contemporary artistic practice, particularly that which is experimental and under-recognized. Research activities include travel, visits to relevant museums, archives and collections, convenings of colleagues and advisory groups as well as the development of related publications. Recipients were selected through the foundation’s biannual open submission process. Curatorial Research Fellowships account for $708,500 of the foundation’s current fiscal year grants budget which totals $13.9 million.

The Fall 2018 Curatorial Research Fellows and supporting institutions are as follows: Kyung An, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Janet Dees, Block Museum of Art; Naima Keith and Diana Nawi, Prospect.5; Daniela Lieja Quintanar, LACE; Meg Onli, Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; Philippe Pirotte, UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive; Lydia Platón Lázaro, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Puerto Rico; Hallie Ringle, The Studio Museum in Harlem; Manuela Well-Off-Man, Museum of Contemporary Native Arts; and Christian Xatrec and Alice Centamore, Emily Harvey Foundation.

“The curators in this group will conduct research on artists and movements that have been overlooked or ignored while engaging with, in many cases, difficult subject matter that is timely and culturally relevant. Their projects will bring new perspectives and methodologies to bear on the study of exhibition-making and currents in contemporary art,” said Joel Wachs, the foundation’s President.

Commenting on the role the fellowship will play in the development of the exhibition Exposure: Native Art and Political Ecology, Manuela Well-Off-Man noted that through interviews with Native populations living on former military test-sites, the fellowship will allow “us to give Indigenous artists a voice to address the long-term effects of man-made, hazardous disasters on Indigenous communities, and consult with experts in the field, including scientists and environmentalists, who can help shape the project.”

In a joint statement, Naima Keith and Diana Nawi reflected on the award’s significance in the early stages of planning for Prospect.5, “We are thrilled to receive the fellowship to support our research at this stage. So much of our methodology is dependent on deep dialogue, and this award enables us to be on the ground and in conversation with different communities and cultural producers in New Orleans, the broader region, and beyond.”

The Curatorial Research Fellowship program is in its 11th year; it has awarded $4.2 million to 125 curators to date. Curators at any career stage are encouraged to apply; applicants must have the formal support of an institution. The next deadline is March 1, 2019.

Fall 2018 Curatorial Research Fellowships | Project Descriptions

Kyung An | Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY
Kyung An, with co-curators, Soojung Kang (Senior Curator, National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul), and Joan Kee (Associate Professor of History of Art, University of Michigan), will explore the dynamic experimental artistic practices that emerged in South Korea in the late 1960s and early 1970s as well as the core groups of artists who spearheaded them in preparation for an exhibition in 2021/22.

Janet Dees | Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
In preparation for the exhibition A Site of Struggle: Making Meaning of Anti-Black Violence in American Art and Visual Culture (working title), Dees will travel to conduct research in archives and collections around the country. She will also bring together scholars, artists, community members, and others for in-depth discussions of the manner in which anti-black violence has been depicted in art over the 19th and 20th centuries and in our day.

Naima Keith and Diana Nawi | Prospect.5, New Orleans, LA
To prepare for the fifth iteration of Prospect New Orleans, artistic directors Naima Keith and Diana Nawi will research, travel, and undertake coalition-building to develop and clarify a set of framing concepts and overall themes for the triennial. Prospect.5 will open in October of 2020.

Daniela Lieja Quintanar | LACE, Los Angeles, CA
Lieja Quintanar is undertaking a project that traces a genealogy of collective artistic practices responding to border violence in Mexico and Central America, and that also examines the ramifications of such violence in US immigrant destination cities like San Diego, El Paso, and Los Angeles. Lieja Quintanar will travel to specific border cities where she will meet with and interview emerging and mid-career artists as well as collectives, curators, academics, activists and journalists, culminating in a bilingual publication, public programs, and an exhibition.

Meg Onli | Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
In preparation for the first career survey of the work of Ulysses Jenkins, the pioneering black performance and video artist who was a central figure in the Studio Z artist group, Meg Onli will undertake several research trips in California and New York, conduct interviews, and explore Jenkin’s archives. The curators will produce an accompanying publication and timeline that will chronicle Jenkins’ career trajectory.

Philippe Pirotte | UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley, CA
The Color Curtain and the Promise of Bandung will bring together historical and contemporary artwork that engages with the Non-Aligned Movement, a group of states not formally aligned with any major power bloc that grew out of a historic 1955 conference in Bandung, Indonesia. Working with an international curatorial team, Pirotte will visit Singapore, Bangladesh, Beirut, Ghana, New York, and Paris among other locations as part of his research.

Lydia Platón Lázaro | Museo de Arte Contemporáneo, San Juan, Puerto Rico
To produce Mourning the Dead: Artists response in the aftermath of Hurricanes Irma and Maria, planned for early 2021,  Platón-Lázaro will research and document creative projects that engage with the losses and grief that pervaded Puerto Rico following the two named devastating storms that took place amid a crippling economic crisis. In addition to the exhibition, Platón-Lázaro will organize a scholarly conference on the intersection of art history, death, mourning, and resilience from a variety of viewpoints.

Hallie Ringle | The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY
Leading a collaboration between The Studio Museum in Harlem and the Birmingham Museum of Art, Ringle (Hugh Kaul Curator of Contemporary Art at the Birmingham Museum of Art and former Assistant Curator at The Studio Museum in Harlem) will produce a traveling exhibition and accompanying monograph—the first ever—on the life and work of artist Mavis Pusey. As a part of her research, she will travel to New York, London, Philadelphia and elsewhere where Pusey studied and worked, making abstract paintings and prints in the mid to late 20th century. Additionally, Ringle will develop an archive of Pusey’s work, which will be vital in documenting this important, yet under-examined and underrepresented artist.

Manuela Well-Off-Man | Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, Santa Fe, NM
To support the forthcoming exhibition Exposure: Native Art and Political Ecology, planned for 2021, Well-Off-Man will visit Indigenous communities in Australia, Canada, Greenland, and the United States, and investigate how their artists have responded to damage caused by nuclear and uranium poisoning on and around their land. An exhibition catalogue will also be produced exploring the deleterious effects nuclear testing has had on native communities around the world.

Christian Xatrec and Alice Centamore | Emily Harvey Foundation, New York, NY
Something Else will celebrate and explore the groundbreaking publishing project Something Else Press (SEP) founded by Dick Higgins in 1963 and active until 1974. Xatrec and Centamore will travel to related archives in the United States and Europe where they will unearth previously unexplored materials which will illuminate the rhizomatic network of the SEP artists and projects. The presentation, sharing, and discussion of their research will first be manifested and put to use over the course of a four-day gathering of scholars, curators, artists, and publishers, to take place at The Emily Harvey Foundation in September 2019.

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The foundation runs an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonné projects. To date, the foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide.

More information about the foundation is available at warholfoundation.org.

Header Image: Mavis Pusey, Puriv, c. 1968, Oil on canvas, 40 × 56 1/2 in. The Studio Museum in Harlem; Museum purchase with funds provided by the Acquisition Committee  2018.4.1 . Photo: Brock & Co, Concord, Massachusetts
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The Warhol Foundation Announces Fall 2018 Grants

$3.65 million will be awarded to 42 arts organizations for scholarly exhibitions, publications, and visual arts programming

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has announced the recipients of its Fall 2018 grant round. $3.65 million will be awarded to 42 arts organizations for exhibitions, publications, and visual arts programming, including film screenings, artist residencies, and new commissions. The foundation has an open submission process with application deadlines in the spring and fall. This biannual program represents $7.2 million of the foundation’s fiscal year grants budget which totals $13.9 million. This round of recipients was selected from an applicant pool of 273 nonprofit organizations. Individual grants range from $44,000-$120,000. A complete list of recipients follows.

The foundation supports artist-centered organizations with a focus on practices that are experimental, under-recognized, and/or challenging in nature. Current grants will fund projects in 16 US states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico with one international recipient, Ashkal Alwan, whose Home Works Forum gathers artists, curators, and scholars from around the world at its home base in Beirut. The foundation’s commitment to highlighting the work of innovative yet often marginalized practitioners is evident in grantee projects, which include a significant exhibition of Arab American artists produced by the St. Paul, MN-based organization Mizna, a series of books published by Visual AIDS that champion the activist practices of artists affected by the disease, and IndieCollect’s restoration and touring retrospective of important films by queer filmmakers. Half of the monographic exhibitions supported in this grant round feature female artists; eight of the ten are dedicated to artists of color. In alignment with the foundation’s commitment to freedom of artistic expression, a grant to the Media Democracy Fund will continue to aid its efforts to insure an open, accessible, and secure internet.

“We strive to support institutions that share our artist-centered values. The small grassroots arts organizations as well as the museums represented here provide invaluable opportunities for artists to express their unique perspectives on the pressing urgencies of the day. We hope that our grants help to amplify artists’ voices within their communities, in national discussions and debates, and across platforms in the international contemporary art world,” said Joel Wachs, the foundation’s President.

Reinforcing the value of the grant to working artists, Bradford Nordeen, Creative Director and Founder of Los Angeles-based Dirty Looks, explained that the award “embolden[s] our support for and compensation of the 75+ arts workers who make the project a reality, ensuring that our artist fees contribute toward a sustainable artistic practice, across our varied collaborations.”

Fall 2018 Grant Recipients | Support for Single Exhibitions

  • Ars Nova Workshop, Philadelphia, PA, Milford Graves exhibition, $44,000
  • UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley, CA, “Ron Nagle: Handsome Drifter,” $75,000
  • Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati, OH, “Art and Race Matters: The Career of Robert Colescott,” $100,000
  • Davis Museum at Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA, “Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons,” $75,000
  • The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, “From the Uncanny Valley to the Crypto Sublime,” $100,000
  • Institute of Contemporary Art / University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, Karyn Olivier exhibition, $50,000
  • John Michael Kohler Arts Center, Sheboygan, WI, “Lenore Tawney: Mirror of the Universe,” $75,000
  • Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, New York, NY, “ON OUR BACKS: The Revolutionary Art of Queer Sex Work,” $50,000
  • Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY, Mrinalini Mukherjee exhibition, $100,000
  • Mizna, St. Paul, MN, “History Is Not Here: Art and the Arab Imaginary,” $50,000
  • MoMA PS1, Long Island City, NY, Group exhibition that grapples with the legacies of the Gulf War in 1991 and the invasion of Iraq in 2003, $100,000
  • Museum of Chinese in America, New York, NY, “Godzilla vs. the Art World: Asian American Collectives,” $50,000
  • Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, TX, “No Man’s Land: Women of Land Art,” $100,000
  • National Museum of the American Indian, New York, NY, “The Oscar Howe Project,” $100,000
  • Pérez Art Museum Miami, Miami, FL, “Teresita Fernández: Elemental,” $100,000
  • Pomona College Museum of Art / Montgomery Art Center, Claremont, CA, Todd Gray exhibition, $50,000
  • Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, WA, “The Allure of Matter: Contemporary Art from China,” $100,000
  • Tufts University Art Galleries, Medford, MA, “Art for the Future: Artists Call and Transnational Solidarity in the 1980s,” $75,000
  • Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN, “Still (A)live,” $100,000

Fall 2018 Grant Recipients | Program Support

  • African Film Festival, New York, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Art Papers, Atlanta, GA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Ashkal Alwan, Beirut, Lebanon, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Beta-Local, San Juan, Puerto Rico, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Burlington City Arts Foundation, Burlington, VT, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Center for Women and Their Work, Austin, TX, $90,000 (over 2 years)
  • Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, IA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Dirty Looks, Los Angeles, CA, $50,000
  • DiverseWorks, Houston, TX, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • IndieCollect, New York, NY, $60,000
  • Light Industry, Brooklyn, NY $60,000 (over 2 years)
  • Midway Contemporary Art, Minneapolis, MN, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • The Mistake Room, Los Angeles, CA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • New Venture Fund, Media Democracy Fund, Washington, DC, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, Philadelphia, PA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, Portland, OR, $120,000 (over 2 years)
  • Root Division, San Francisco, CA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Santa Fe Art Institute, Santa Fe, NM, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Socrates Sculpture Park, Long Island City, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Times Square Alliance, New York, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • The Underground Museum, Los Angeles, CA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, Salt Lake City, UT, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Visual AIDS, New York, NY, $80,000 (over 2 years)

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonné projects. To date, the foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide.

More information about the foundation is available at warholfoundation.org.

Header Image: Future Ladies of Wrestling at Moonlight Rollerway (5110 San Fernando Rd, Glendale, CA) on July 04, 2018. Photograph by Paolo Singer, event organized by Women’s Center for Creative Work. Courtesy of Dirty Looks.
NMAI_NY
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The Warhol Foundation Board Lifts 8-Year Funding Ban on the Smithsonian

Foundation will award $100,000 to the National Museum for the American Indian for a major Oscar Howe retrospective

The Board of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has voted to lift its eight-year funding ban on the Smithsonian Institution. The Foundation will award $100,000 to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) for a major Oscar Howe retrospective as part of its Fall 2018 Grants, which will be announced next week. The Oscar Howe Project will include the first major retrospective, touring exhibition, and publication to feature the work of this groundbreaking and influential artist. The exhibition will include approximately 75 paintings, many of which will be on view publicly for the first time. Oscar Howe (1915-1983), a member of the Yanktonai Dakota tribe, was a pioneering student of Dorothy Dunn, an influential non-Native teacher who developed and promoted rigid aesthetic standards that came to define Native American painting in the United States in the early to mid-20th century. Howe pushed against these conventions and experimented with dynamic abstract compositions in pursuit of his own modernist style. He was openly critical of the narrow parameters imposed upon Native art and strongly defended the right of Native artists to steer their own paths. His work as both an artist and an activist is widely seen as a major influence on experimental contemporary Native art.

The funding ban on the Smithsonian was initiated in 2010 after the National Portrait Gallery, under pressure from the Catholic League and several Washington politicians, removed artist David Wojnarowicz’s video A Fire in My Belly from the Foundation-supported exhibition Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture. At the time, Foundation President Joel Wachs requested that then-Secretary Wayne Clough return the work to view noting that, “Such blatant censorship is unconscionable. It is inimical to everything the Smithsonian Institution should stand for, and everything the Andy Warhol Foundation does stand for.” When the work was not restored, the Foundation board, acting from its longstanding commitment to freedom of expression, unanimously decided to suspend funding for all Smithsonian museums.

Reflecting on the current grant, Wachs stated, “We believe that the ban has had its intended effect of promoting freedom of artistic expression at the national level. The Smithsonian has also demonstrated a strong track record of highlighting underrepresented artists over the past eight years, which aligns well with the Foundation’s core values. While Wojnarowicz and Howe were very different artists working in different circumstances, both fiercely advocated for the visibility and inclusion of marginalized perspectives in contemporary art discourse. Both were driven by a belief that communities should take control of their own narratives, particularly in the face of misguided (and malicious) attempts by others to do it for them. Howe’s work was revolutionary in its time and paved the way for Native artists to claim greater agency; his life and work are a testament to the strength of artistic commitment to shape and influence contemporary culture.”

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The Foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonné projects. To date, the Foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide.

More information about the Foundation is available at warholfoundation.org.

Header Image: The National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City. Photo by David Sundberg (2016)
WocMural2
Regional Regranting Program,

Warhol Foundation Expands Regional Regranting Program to Cleveland & Denver and Reinstates Baltimore Program

Annual program will distribute $1.4 million to organizations for approximately $840,000 in grants for under-the-radar artist-driven projects across 14 cities/states

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is expanding its Regional Regranting Program to Cleveland and Denver where it will be administered by the non-profit arts organizations SPACES and RedLine respectively. At the same time, Baltimore’s program, The Grit Fund (TGF), will come back on line after a one-year hiatus under the new administration of Baltimore Arts Realty Corp (BARCO). With the addition of these three sites to its roster of 11 others across the country, the Regional Regranting Program will be poised to distribute $1.4 million to organizations for approximately $840,000 in yearly grants for grassroots artist-driven projects across 14 cities/states.

In addition to money for grants, each regranting organization will receive significant funding for program administration and outreach. SPACES’ Satellite Fund will offer ten $6,000 project-based grants to artists in Cuyahoga County; info sessions and the application deadline will be scheduled for spring 2019. RedLine’s INSITE Fund will award 10-15 grants of up to $5,000 each to artists and arts collectives in the Denver Metro area; info sessions will begin in January for a summer 2019 application deadline. BARCO’s Grit Fund will provide 9-12 awards of up to $7,000 each for Baltimore-based projects; applications will open in February with info sessions to take place through March 2019.

Established in 2007, the Regional Regranting Program has awarded $6.4 million in grants to organizations, which has resulted in $3.6 million in direct support of 848 artist projects to date. With the expansion, regranting organizations will be located in Albuquerque, Baltimore, Chicago, Cleveland, Denver, Houston, Kansas City, Miami, Minneapolis, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Portland (OR), Portland (ME), and San Francisco. The program aims to support under-the radar projects that engage with the public. Recent examples include “Ambergris,” a multimedia installation on Portland, Maine’s Fish Exchange that explores opiate addiction in the commercial fishing industry and “Wak’ó Mujeres Phụ nữ Womxn Mural,” a collaborative mural and digital project that celebrates the daily lives of Kansan women of color.

“Informal experimental artistic practice comprises the majority of visual arts activity in this country, yet is often overlooked and lacks existing mechanisms for funding, which tend to favor high profile exhibitions at large institutions. We are confident that the expansion of the program and the reinstatement of The Grit Fund will introduce many new innovative and public-facing artist projects into the grassroots arts communities of Baltimore, Cleveland, and Denver,” said Joel Wachs, President, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

“SPACES is thrilled to work with The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts on the Satellite Fund, to support the numerous kinds of artistic practices taking place in Cuyahoga County. Aligned with our mission of supporting artists who explore and experiment, the Satellite Fund will take into consideration the plurality of expression by individual visual artists, collectives, and unincorporated artist-driven initiatives working to strengthen the culture in this region,” said Christina Vassallo, Executive Director, SPACES.

Louise Martorano, Executive Director, RedLine, spoke about the importance of the funding for the Denver arts community, “The INSITE Fund will significantly add to Denver’s creative ecosystem and infrastructure by supporting artist-driven projects that sit outside the “norm” of arts experiences and lead to expanded audiences. At RedLine, this fund supports our continuous effort to remove barriers that exist between artists and funding opportunities and thus between artists ideas and making those ideas possible.”

“We are thrilled to be able to bring the Grit Fund back to Baltimore where it has played a vital role in funding artist-led projects that have been excluded from traditional funding sources. The fund provides an important resource for artists to develop collaborative and public-facing artwork that builds on Baltimore’s national reputation as a center for transformative art that is community-based,” said Amy Bonitz, President & CEO of Baltimore Arts Realty Corporation.  

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is theadvancement of the visual arts. The Foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonné projects. To date, the Foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide.

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts: warholfoundation.org
Baltimore Arts Realty Corp (BARCO): baltimoreartsrealty.com/#grit-fund
RedLine: redlineart.org/insite-fund
SPACES: spacesgallery.org

Header Image: Wak’ó Mujeres Phụ nữ Womxn Mural, Rocket Grant 2017 Recipient, Lawrence, KS. First day of priming with community members. Photo: Leah Evans.
freedom of expression,

Warhol Foundation Condemns CAH Grant Requirement as a Flagrant Attack on Free Speech

Government agency wants to cut funding for “lewd, lascivious, vulgar, overtly political” work

New York, NY – Joel Wachs, President of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, today condemned a recent DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities (CAH) grant requirement as a flagrant attack on free speech. The proposed requirement gives CAH the right to terminate funding to grantees who produce work that is “lewd, lascivious, vulgar, overtly political, excessively violent, constitutes sexual harassment, or is, in any other way, illegal.” The requirement goes on to state that the interpretation of these terms is “at the sole discretion of CAH.” CAH emailed the requirement in a proposed amendment to grantees who had already been notified of their awards.

The Warhol Foundation has given significant grants to artist-centered organizations in the region that also receive CAH funding, including Washington Project for the Arts (WPA) and Transformer. WPA and Transformer have indicated that they will not be signing the amendment. The National Coalition Against Censorship (NCAC), a long-time grantee of the Foundation, and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of DC also intend to ask CAH to rescind the amendment.

“We fiercely condemn the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities’ recent amendment to its grantees’ contracts; we stand with NCAC, the ACLU, and the DC-area arts community in their efforts to reject funder restrictions on artistic content. The amendment is a blatant attack on free speech and a direct threat to all artists and nonprofit organizations that produce challenging work, provide diverse perspectives, and confront social and/or political issues that are of vital importance to their communities. As a government agency, CAH has a responsibility to uphold First Amendment rights; it should immediately retract the amendment, which has stifling implications for freedom of artistic expression,” said Joel Wachs, President, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

UPDATE 11/8/18, 3:50 PM: According to the Washington City Paper, Mayor Bowser is withdrawing the amendment. 

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The Foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonné projects. To date, the Foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide.

More information about the Foundation is available at warholfoundation.org.

Andy Warhol,

Foundation President Responds to Tree of Life Synagogue Shooting

“We condemn the tragic shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, the city where our founder, Andy Warhol, was born and raised. We offer our sincere condolences to the friends and families of the victims of this tragedy. This act and all hateful acts of violence seek to silence and destroy communities that have a long history of being marginalized. We are reminded of the importance of diverse perspectives and why the Foundation actively works to fight inequities in our culture. In 1980, Warhol produced a series of portraits of notable Jewish thinkers and icons, entitled “Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth Century.” We are sharing these images today to honor these leaders and to voice our support for the Jewish community at large,” Joel Wachs, President of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. October 30, 2018.

 

Warhol Foundation Board
News,

Warhol Foundation Appoints New Board Chair and Three New Board Members

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has elected a new board chair, Julián Zugazagoitia, and three new board members: Naomi Beckwith, Cary J. Davis, and Deborah Willis, Ph.D. Zugazagoitia succeeds Igor DaCosta, who recently completed his term of distinguished service. The Warhol Foundation board is a diverse group of 17 artists, curators, directors, scholars, and visual arts leaders from throughout the country.

Joel Wachs, President of the Foundation, said, “Since he joined the board seven years ago, Julián has made a significant impact and we are looking forward to his leadership as chair. At the same time, we are honored to welcome Naomi, Cary, and Deborah; their perspectives will be vital as we seek to support artist-centered institutions in the field.”

Julián Zugazagoitia has been the Director and CEO of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City since 2010. During his tenure, attendance has grown 43%. Known for his high-energy leadership and collaborative spirit, Zugazagoitia previously served as Director and CEO of El Museo del Barrio in New York, where he oversaw a $44 million renovation project. He has also held positions at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, UNESCO, and the Getty Conservation Institute, and has curated exhibitions internationally.

Naomi Beckwith is the Manilow Senior Curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (MCA), where her exhibition and book projects focus on the impact of identity and multi-disciplinary practices for shaping contemporary art. Prior to the MCA, she held positions at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia and the Studio Museum in Harlem. She served on the jury of the 56th Venice Biennale and was the 2015 recipient of the New Leadership award from ArtTable.

Cary J. Davis is a senior partner at Warburg Pincus, and is responsible for the firm’s investments in the software and financial technology sectors. In addition to serving as a director on seven corporate boards, he is Chairman-Elect of the American Academy in Rome, and has been Chairman of the Jewish Community House of Bensonhurst, Chairman of the Boys Prep charter school, an adjunct professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Business, and a member of the Contemporary Arts Council at the Museum of Modern Art.

Deborah Willis, Ph.D, is a photographer and one of the nation’s leading historians of African American photography and curator of African American culture. She is University Professor and Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University. She has received the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship and was a Richard D. Cohen Fellow in African and African American Art, Hutchins Center, Harvard University; a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow, and an Alphonse Fletcher, Jr. Fellow.

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The Foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonné projects. To date, the Foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide. More information about the Foundation is available at warholfoundation.org.

Photo: Several members of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Board. Back row (left to right): Carrie Mae Weems, Paul Ha, Adam Weinberg, Joel Wachs, Julián Zugazagoitia, Ruby Lerner, Shana Berger, Courtney Fink. Front row (left to right): Igor DaCosta, Sarah Elizabeth Lewis, Trevor Schoonmaker.

 

Warhol-Vol5-Box-EN-7560-Two-Volumes-Standing-2 (1)
Andy Warhol,

The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné: Volume 5 (1976-1978)

Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait with Skull, early 1978, acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, 16 x 13 inches, 40.6 x 33 cm. The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., Photo by Phillips/Schwab

The fifth volume of The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné has been published by Phaidon Press. Volume 5 documents Warhol’s paintings from 1976-1978 that were produced at 860 Broadway, the studio he occupied for a decade, from 1974 to 1984. This volume includes 733 paintings, featuring the Skull and Hammer and Sickle series, two of Warhol’s most powerful bodies of work. Other chapters document his commissioned portraits, a portrait series of famous athletes, the Torsos and Sex Parts paintings, and a group of self-portraits. The abstract Piss, Oxidation and Cum series, which were Warhol’s first paintings to be produced without a camera since 1962, mark a radical departure in his art.

Volume 5 is edited by Neil Printz with Sally King-Nero as Executive Editor. Printz has edited all five volumes of The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné. Started in 1993, this multi-volume scholarly project, sponsored by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, will document all of Warhol’s work in paintings, sculptures, and drawings. Single volumes are dedicated to a particular period, starting with Volume 1, which covers Warhol’s paintings and sculptures from 1961-1963. Each work is thoroughly researched; catalogue entries include detailed records of provenance, exhibitions, and relevant literature as well as supplementary illustrations and annotations recording Warhol’s visual sources and reconstructing his exhibitions. The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné presents the most exhaustive record of Warhol’s work and serves as a testament to Warhol’s enduring importance in contemporary culture.

Volume 6 is currently in preparation. Owners of works by Andy Warhol are encouraged to contact the Foundation by submitting this owner information sheet through our website.

 

 

The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné, Paintings 1976-1978 – Volume 5, Editor Neil Printz and Executive Editor Sally King Nero, Phaidon; volume 05A, open at gatefold, pages 78-79, showing 15 x 19 inch Skull Paintings, circa 1975-76. Artwork © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné, Paintings 1976-1978 – Volume 5, Editor Neil Printz and Executive Editor Sally King-Nero, Phaidon; volume 05A, open at pages 108-109, showing six-foot Hammer and Sickle Paintings, 1976. Artwork © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné, Paintings 1976-1978 – Volume 5, Editor Neil Printz and Executive Editor Sally King-Nero, Phaidon; volume 05B, open at pages 188-189, showing Oxidation: 40 x 30 inch-canvases, circa 1977-79 (left) and Oxidation: 16 x 12 inch-canvases, 1977-78 (left and right). Artwork © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Please visit Phaidon for information about ordering The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonné. Save 20% + free shipping with code CHWH5.

In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The Foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and rigorous scholarly research for ongoing catalogues raisonnés projects. To date, the Foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide. Learn more at warholfoundation.org

Aerial Photo of Ucross Foundation
Grantee Spotlight,

Ucross Fellowship for Native American Visual Artists

The recently launched Ucross Fellowship for Native American Visual Artists is given to two artists annually, and provides artists with a one-month residency, a stipend, and inclusion in an exhibition in the Ucross Art Gallery. Located in northeast Wyoming in the foothills of the Bighorn Mountains, Ucross Foundation has awarded over 2,000 residencies to writers, composers, and visual artists in its 36-year-old history. This new fellowship honors Native artists in a region that holds deep cultural significance for Native American communities. Artist Sydney Jane Brooke Campbell Maybrier Pursel received the inaugural fellowship this year. Artist Brenda Mallory has been named the second recipient and will be in residence at Ucross in the fall. Both artists will be featured in an exhibition at the Museum of Art Fort Collins from January 17 – March 17, 2019 after which the exhibition will be on view at the Ucross Art Gallery from June 15 – September 14, 2019. The next fellowship application deadline is October 1st for one-month residencies taking place during March, April, or May 2019.

Photo of Sydney Pursel

Sydney Pursel specializes in socially engaged, activist, performance, video, and new media arts. As a member of the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska with strong Irish Catholic roots, she investigates personal identity and contemporary Indigenous issues through art. Some of Pursel’s projects serve to educate others about food politics, assimilation, language loss, appropriation, and history in addition to community projects that focus on language acquisition, culture, and art. At Ucross, she worked on a leather patchwork wearable and the bodysuit and stripes of a flag that will accompany a video performance.

Photo of Brenda Mallory

A member of the Cherokee Nation, Brenda Mallory produces a range of work from individual wall-hangings and sculptures to large-scale installations. She uses mixed media to create multiple forms that are joined with crude hardware or mechanical devices in ways that imply tenuous connections and aberrations. She is interested in ideas of interference and disruption of long-established systems in nature and human cultures. Mallory grew up in Oklahoma and currently lives in Portland, Oregon.

Currently on view at Ucross Art Gallery is Wildlife, Pattern and Identity: Contemporary Native American Work from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation. The exhibition features the work of ten artists, including Rick Bartow, James Lavadour, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Wendy Red Star, and Marie Watt. In honor of the Native American Fellowship, a print by Brenda Mallory (The Plural of Nexus, 2015) is also featured in the exhibition. A public reception will take place on Saturday, August 25th with a reading by Native American poet Sherwin Bitsui, who will be a writer-in-residence at Ucross. The gallery will also present the documentary Native Art Now! for the duration of the exhibition.

Photo of Ucross Foundation entrance sign

Photo Credit: Bill Megalos

The Ucross Art Gallery is located ½ mile east of the intersection of Highways 14 and 16 in Ucross, Wyoming. Gallery hours are Monday – Friday, 8:30AM – 4:00PM and on Saturdays in July and August from 10:00AM to 4:00PM.

Ucross Foundation is a Fall 2017 Grantee of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Established in 1987, the Foundation’s  mission is the advancement of the visual arts. Our innovative and flexible grants program has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad. The next application deadline is September 1, 2018. Learn more at warholfoundation.org

Header Image: Ucross Foundation, Photo credit: Bill Megalos.