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January 2019

DirtyLooks
grantee, News,

The Warhol Foundation Announces Fall 2018 Grants

$3.65 million will be awarded to 42 arts organizations for scholarly exhibitions, publications, and visual arts programming

The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has announced the recipients of its Fall 2018 grant round. $3.65 million will be awarded to 42 arts organizations for exhibitions, publications, and visual arts programming, including film screenings, artist residencies, and new commissions. The foundation has an open submission process with application deadlines in the spring and fall. This biannual program represents $7.2 million of the foundation’s fiscal year grants budget which totals $13.9 million. This round of recipients was selected from an applicant pool of 273 nonprofit organizations. Individual grants range from $44,000-$120,000. A complete list of recipients follows.

The foundation supports artist-centered organizations with a focus on practices that are experimental, under-recognized, and/or challenging in nature. Current grants will fund projects in 16 US states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico with one international recipient, Ashkal Alwan, whose Home Works Forum gathers artists, curators, and scholars from around the world at its home base in Beirut. The foundation’s commitment to highlighting the work of innovative yet often marginalized practitioners is evident in grantee projects, which include a significant exhibition of Arab American artists produced by the St. Paul, MN-based organization Mizna, a series of books published by Visual AIDS that champion the activist practices of artists affected by the disease, and IndieCollect’s restoration and touring retrospective of important films by queer filmmakers. Half of the monographic exhibitions supported in this grant round feature female artists; eight of the ten are dedicated to artists of color. In alignment with the foundation’s commitment to freedom of artistic expression, a grant to the Media Democracy Fund will continue to aid its efforts to insure an open, accessible, and secure internet.

“We strive to support institutions that share our artist-centered values. The small grassroots arts organizations as well as the museums represented here provide invaluable opportunities for artists to express their unique perspectives on the pressing urgencies of the day. We hope that our grants help to amplify artists’ voices within their communities, in national discussions and debates, and across platforms in the international contemporary art world,” said Joel Wachs, the foundation’s President.

Reinforcing the value of the grant to working artists, Bradford Nordeen, Creative Director and Founder of Los Angeles-based Dirty Looks, explained that the award “embolden[s] our support for and compensation of the 75+ arts workers who make the project a reality, ensuring that our artist fees contribute toward a sustainable artistic practice, across our varied collaborations.”

Fall 2018 Grant Recipients | Support for Single Exhibitions

  • Ars Nova Workshop, Philadelphia, PA, Milford Graves exhibition, $44,000
  • UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley, CA, “Ron Nagle: Handsome Drifter,” $75,000
  • Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati, OH, “Art and Race Matters: The Career of Robert Colescott,” $100,000
  • Davis Museum at Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA, “Fatimah Tuggar: Home’s Horizons,” $75,000
  • The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, “From the Uncanny Valley to the Crypto Sublime,” $100,000
  • Institute of Contemporary Art / University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, Karyn Olivier exhibition, $50,000
  • John Michael Kohler Arts Center, Sheboygan, WI, “Lenore Tawney: Mirror of the Universe,” $75,000
  • Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, New York, NY, “ON OUR BACKS: The Revolutionary Art of Queer Sex Work,” $50,000
  • Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY, Mrinalini Mukherjee exhibition, $100,000
  • Mizna, St. Paul, MN, “History Is Not Here: Art and the Arab Imaginary,” $50,000
  • MoMA PS1, Long Island City, NY, Group exhibition that grapples with the legacies of the Gulf War in 1991 and the invasion of Iraq in 2003, $100,000
  • Museum of Chinese in America, New York, NY, “Godzilla vs. the Art World: Asian American Collectives,” $50,000
  • Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, TX, “No Man’s Land: Women of Land Art,” $100,000
  • National Museum of the American Indian, New York, NY, “The Oscar Howe Project,” $100,000
  • Pérez Art Museum Miami, Miami, FL, “Teresita Fernández: Elemental,” $100,000
  • Pomona College Museum of Art / Montgomery Art Center, Claremont, CA, Todd Gray exhibition, $50,000
  • Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, WA, “The Allure of Matter: Contemporary Art from China,” $100,000
  • Tufts University Art Galleries, Medford, MA, “Art for the Future: Artists Call and Transnational Solidarity in the 1980s,” $75,000
  • Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN, “Still (A)live,” $100,000

Fall 2018 Grant Recipients | Program Support

  • African Film Festival, New York, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Art Papers, Atlanta, GA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Ashkal Alwan, Beirut, Lebanon, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Beta-Local, San Juan, Puerto Rico, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Burlington City Arts Foundation, Burlington, VT, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Center for Women and Their Work, Austin, TX, $90,000 (over 2 years)
  • Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, IA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Dirty Looks, Los Angeles, CA, $50,000
  • DiverseWorks, Houston, TX, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • IndieCollect, New York, NY, $60,000
  • Light Industry, Brooklyn, NY $60,000 (over 2 years)
  • Midway Contemporary Art, Minneapolis, MN, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • The Mistake Room, Los Angeles, CA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • New Venture Fund, Media Democracy Fund, Washington, DC, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, Philadelphia, PA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, Portland, OR, $120,000 (over 2 years)
  • Root Division, San Francisco, CA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Santa Fe Art Institute, Santa Fe, NM, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Socrates Sculpture Park, Long Island City, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Times Square Alliance, New York, NY, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • The Underground Museum, Los Angeles, CA, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, Salt Lake City, UT, $100,000 (over 2 years)
  • Visual AIDS, New York, NY, $80,000 (over 2 years)

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonné projects. To date, the foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide.

More information about the foundation is available at warholfoundation.org.

Header Image: Future Ladies of Wrestling at Moonlight Rollerway (5110 San Fernando Rd, Glendale, CA) on July 04, 2018. Photograph by Paolo Singer, event organized by Women’s Center for Creative Work. Courtesy of Dirty Looks.
NMAI_NY
freedom of expression, grantee,

The Warhol Foundation Board Lifts 8-Year Funding Ban on the Smithsonian

Foundation will award $100,000 to the National Museum for the American Indian for a major Oscar Howe retrospective

The Board of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has voted to lift its eight-year funding ban on the Smithsonian Institution. The Foundation will award $100,000 to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) for a major Oscar Howe retrospective as part of its Fall 2018 Grants, which will be announced next week. The Oscar Howe Project will include the first major retrospective, touring exhibition, and publication to feature the work of this groundbreaking and influential artist. The exhibition will include approximately 75 paintings, many of which will be on view publicly for the first time. Oscar Howe (1915-1983), a member of the Yanktonai Dakota tribe, was a pioneering student of Dorothy Dunn, an influential non-Native teacher who developed and promoted rigid aesthetic standards that came to define Native American painting in the United States in the early to mid-20th century. Howe pushed against these conventions and experimented with dynamic abstract compositions in pursuit of his own modernist style. He was openly critical of the narrow parameters imposed upon Native art and strongly defended the right of Native artists to steer their own paths. His work as both an artist and an activist is widely seen as a major influence on experimental contemporary Native art.

The funding ban on the Smithsonian was initiated in 2010 after the National Portrait Gallery, under pressure from the Catholic League and several Washington politicians, removed artist David Wojnarowicz’s video A Fire in My Belly from the Foundation-supported exhibition Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture. At the time, Foundation President Joel Wachs requested that then-Secretary Wayne Clough return the work to view noting that, “Such blatant censorship is unconscionable. It is inimical to everything the Smithsonian Institution should stand for, and everything the Andy Warhol Foundation does stand for.” When the work was not restored, the Foundation board, acting from its longstanding commitment to freedom of expression, unanimously decided to suspend funding for all Smithsonian museums.

Reflecting on the current grant, Wachs stated, “We believe that the ban has had its intended effect of promoting freedom of artistic expression at the national level. The Smithsonian has also demonstrated a strong track record of highlighting underrepresented artists over the past eight years, which aligns well with the Foundation’s core values. While Wojnarowicz and Howe were very different artists working in different circumstances, both fiercely advocated for the visibility and inclusion of marginalized perspectives in contemporary art discourse. Both were driven by a belief that communities should take control of their own narratives, particularly in the face of misguided (and malicious) attempts by others to do it for them. Howe’s work was revolutionary in its time and paved the way for Native artists to claim greater agency; his life and work are a testament to the strength of artistic commitment to shape and influence contemporary culture.”

ABOUT THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS: In accordance with Andy Warhol’s will, the mission of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts is the advancement of the visual arts. The Foundation manages an innovative and flexible grants program while also preserving Warhol’s legacy through creative and responsible licensing policies and extensive scholarly research for ongoing catalogue raisonné projects. To date, the Foundation has given over $200 million in cash grants to over 1,000 arts organizations in 49 states and abroad and has donated 52,786 works of art to 322 institutions worldwide.

More information about the Foundation is available at warholfoundation.org.

Header Image: The National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City. Photo by David Sundberg (2016)